Case story

  • Peru

Facilitator

BHP Billiton & Xstrata, Tintaya Mine, ‘Mesa de Diàlogo’ Dialogue Table, Peru 2004

'Putting Ourselves in Their Shoes': The Dialogue Table of Tintaya

Case Story

‘Putting Ourselves in Their Shoes’ tells of the rising resentments among community members to the operations of Tintaya mine through the course of its government ownership and subsequent privatization, and the way these came to a head when ownership passed to BHP Billiton. It relates the process by which organisations such as Oxfam Australia, Oxfam America, CooperAccion and Corecami entered the picture, and the important roles they played in helping give birth to the process and/or supporting the communities’ ability to engage effectively. It relays the concerns of communities and their leaders, the pressures on the company at the time, and how ultimately, all parties agreed upon the creation of a 'Dialogue Table' that identified key issues, principles and ground rules for an ongoing dialogue process that continues to this day. It conveys setbacks for both communities and company in the process, and the ultimate achievement of meaningful and sustainable outcomes. 

This is the second of four films in a series on company-community dialogue produced by the Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School on behalf of the mandate of the former Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie. The first film in the series,Making Monkey Business, involves a hydro-electric power plant and surrounding communities in the Philippines; the third, The Only Government We See, involves an oil and gas company and local communities in the Niger Delta. The fourth and final film, Company-Community Dialogue: An Introduction, is a compilation of the first three that highlights common themes between them. The films were produced with the generous support of the Government of Norway, the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman of the World Bank Group, the International Bar Association and the Government of Germany. The films are MATCH productions. On November 29, 2012, the series won “best communication or publication” award at the biennial Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution's (CEDR) awards ceremony held in London. The series makes a compelling case for Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) methods and processes, using real life corporate-community case studies to show the immediate and long term benefits of facilitated dialogue.

Original Author(s)

The Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative at Harvard Kennedy School on behalf of the mandate for the former Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie.